Alex is still Alive by Simon Baumann
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Alex is still Alive by Simon Baumann
Alex is still Alive, Simon Baumann

Alex is still Alive, Simon Baumann

Simon Baumann introduces his short documentary film, Alex is still Alive:

Following Kubrick’s detailed location notes for A Clockwork Orange, Alex is still Alive takes the viewer back to the architectural space of the ultra-violent activities of the Droogs. Can you still hear echoes of boots, Ludwig Van and Gene Kelley? Has the 1960s concrete decayed with acid rain or the haunting presence of a corroding evil? This quite contemplation of space and memory raises many such question.

Alex is still Alive is a short documentary film showing the real locations of A Clockwork Orange. The film also uses Stanley Kubrick’s original script notes which describe these places from his very personal point of view. But not only do the script notes tell us more about these places, the architectural and social developments give their own very special information about past and present. And even the contradiction between the images of the locations nowadays and the notes from the time that Clockwork Orange was filmed create a unique atmosphere. It seems to me as if the spirit of the film is still present at these places.

A Clockwork Orange is an iconic movie. It reflects social situation as well as painting a portrait of London. Many of the locations used in the movie have changed. I was looking at these locations again, trying to find the moods and characteristics that bring them back to life. In fact these places are already real life!

The film is inspired not only by Kubrick as a director but as well inspired by the art of his filmmaking. As much as I admire Stanley Kubrick’s masterpiece A Clockwork Orange and Malcolm McDowell’s acting, I tried very hard to be as objective as much as possible.

Check out APEngine’s interview with Simon Baumann for more about the inspiration behind the film.

Get the Flash Player to see the wordTube Media Player.

Credits
Director: Simon Baumann
Written by: Simon Baumann and Kasia Prus
Camera: Simon Baumann
Sound & Music: Harry Johnson
Funded by: BFI Education & University of the Arts London
In Cooperation with: The Stanley Kubrick Archive at LCC


  1. Jen says:

    The sound seems to cut out at 4:30! :(

  2. abigail says:

    Sorry for the technical glitch. The video is fixed now. Enjoy!

  3. Apollo Staar says:

    Great short! I love the narration. Just enough info to know each location.
    For Clockwork Orange lovers only!
    Thanks.
    -Apollo

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